links

Evonomics is live!

The web magazine Evonomics is now live. The blurb:

A revolution in economics and business is taking place. Orthodox economics is quickly being replaced by the latest science of human behavior and how social systems work. Few are aware of these deep and profound changes underway that have power to transform the world.  Not anymore!  Evonomics is the home for thinkers who are applying the ground-breaking science to their lives and who want to see their ideas influence society.

I’d recommend these articles as a starting point:

Why Neoclassical and Behavioral Economics Doesn’t Make Sense without Darwin, by Terry Burnham

The Real Power of Free Markets, by Rory Sutherland

A Different Way to Look at the Economy, by W. Brian Arthur

Evolution Takes over One of the World’s Best Business Schools, by Jonathan Haidt

Who Is the Real Father of Economics?, an interview of Robert Frank by David Sloan Wilson

Also on Evonomics is my recent talk at the MSiX conference, Please, Not Another Bias! The Problem with Behavioral Economics.

The first batch of articles bashes neoclassical economics a lot. I hope that as the magazine evolves there will be some interesting interaction between the proponents of new approaches. Beneath the surface, there are some substantial differences between the proponents as to what this new approach looks like, and it will be interesting to see those differences teased out.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. American hippopotamus. HT: Scott Alexander.
  2. A walk in the park increases poor research practices and decreases reviewer critical thinking.
  3. Encourage more students to study science and put their future employment at greater risk.
  4. Behavioural economics and savings.
  5. The economic future for men.
  6. Why twitter is terrible. I don’t spend much time there any more.
  7. The mainstream may be getting dumber by the day, but we are living in what looks like a golden age of publishing for, of all people, the university presses.

And if you missed them, my posts from the last week:

  1. Sam Bowles on the death of Homo Economicus.
  2. A grumpy rant on behavioural economics.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. Highly rated doctors may not be that good. HT: Scott Alexander
  2. A Nobel prize for the inventor of vaping?
  3. Vaccinated people can still spread whooping cough.
  4. More complex products require elaborate networks of teamwork, and only a few places manage the trick.
  5. Intelligence and criminal behaviour by Joseph Schwartz and friends. No surprises here.
  6. Self control and political ideology. HT: Tyler Cowen
  7. Why the US can’t copy Sweden.
  8. Not enough studies involve blinding.

And if you missed them, my posts from the last week:

  1. The Evolutionary Foundations of Economics.
  2. Please experiment on us.
  3. The more we can send the message we have no idea, the better.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. Storytelling about famous experiments tends to go a bit askew.
  2. Noah Smith takes on Deirdre McCloskey.
  3. Chimps on the drink.
  4. A review of Richard Thaler’s ‘Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioural Economics’.
  5. The gender gap in tech.

And if you missed them, my posts from the last week:

  1. MSiX 2015 is on July 30 in Sydney, and features yours truly.
  2. Humans cause accidents.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. Nobody is doing more to save the NHS than the “drinkers, smokers or fatties”.
  2. Some bashing of the benefits of education: Did schooling drive the industrial revolution? Against tulip (education) subsidies.
  3. Is war on the wane?
  4. The Dead Sea lives.

And if you missed them, my posts from the last week:

  1. Why family friendly policies backfire.
  2. The winner effect in humans.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. Two perspectives on the chocolate study – Scott Alexander and Andrew Gelman. I would say that the chocolate study didn’t tell us anything that we didn’t already know.
  2. Self-deluded leaders.
  3. The education myth.
  4. If only chimpanzees had ovens. HT: Tyler Cowen

And if you missed them, my posts from the last week:

  1. Ration information. Avoid news.
  2. Measurement error on 23andme.
  3. Merton on retirement incomes.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. Eugenics, ready or not. A good long read.
  2. Tort reform preventing people from suing for “weight related harms” may increase attempts to lose weight. HT: Ryan Murphy
  3. What does behavioural economics mean for income distribution? The argument ignores most the interesting subtleties, as there are questions around what the reference point is, how you could redistribute while avoiding loss frames etc., but the idea is still worth considering.
  4. Cholesterol is OK.
  5. The number of childless women in their 40s is falling, particularly among the most educated.
  6. If you’re in Sydney on June 17, Rob Brooks is presenting on the price of sex.
  7. Some coverage of my new paper in the Daily Mail and (for those who can get through the paywall) The Times.

And if you missed them, my posts this week:

  1. The thinking behind my newly published paper.
  2. Fifty years of twin studies.

A week of links

Links this week (or more like two weeks):

  1. Another favourite behavioural science story bites the dust.
  2. Three schools of thought on decision making.
  3. Better teachers receive worse evaluations.
  4. An attempt to reduce bias backfires.
  5. Biased scientists.
  6. Hayek and business management.
  7. More highly educated women are having children.

Life continues to be busy, so posting will continue to be sparse for at least another couple of weeks.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. On the misplaced politics of behavioral policy interventions. And hawkish biases.
  2. Noah Smith v Bryan Caplan on education signalling – 1, 2 and 3. I believe signalling is an important part of the education story, but Smith’s argument about costly signalling is on point.
  3. Robert Trivers on his friends and enemies. HT: Razib

And if you missed it, my one post this last week:

  1. Bad nudges toward organ donation.

Life continues to be busy, so posting will continue to be sparse.

A week of links

Links this week (or more like two weeks):

  1. The problem with satisfied patients.
  2. Happiness inequality.
  3. Explaining the growth mindset.
  4. Gender-blind economists.
  5. Logical versus ecological rationality.
  6. Slaughter scientific peer review. HT: Christopher Snowdon.
  7. Poor children have smaller brains.

And if you missed them, my posts from the last two weeks:

  1. Unemployment and self control.
  2. Uncertainty and understanding behaviour.

Life is busy at the moment, so posting will continue to be sparse over the next month.