neuroscience

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. American hippopotamus. HT: Scott Alexander.
  2. A walk in the park increases poor research practices and decreases reviewer critical thinking.
  3. Encourage more students to study science and put their future employment at greater risk.
  4. Behavioural economics and savings.
  5. The economic future for men.
  6. Why twitter is terrible. I don’t spend much time there any more.
  7. The mainstream may be getting dumber by the day, but we are living in what looks like a golden age of publishing for, of all people, the university presses.

And if you missed them, my posts from the last week:

  1. Sam Bowles on the death of Homo Economicus.
  2. A grumpy rant on behavioural economics.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. The workplace is needed to overcome our lack of self control.
  2. Resisting instant gratification – the FT explores Walter Mischel’s the Marshmallow Test.
  3. Most critiques of twin studies recycle the same discredited 40-year-old arguments. Here’s another paper pulling them apart.
  4. The college educated are still getting married, just later. The same can’t be said for everyone else.
  5. A critique of the 10,000 hour rule. But people should not feel obliged to follow every mention of the role of genetics with an apology for war, slavery and genocide (surprised eugenics didn’t get a mention).
  6. People respond to prices on medical procedures. Demand curves still slope down.
  7. Your baby looks like your ex. Slightly disturbing.
  8. A collection of W. Brian Arthur papers on complexity in economics is due out at the end of the month.
  9. Matt Ridley reviews Steven Johnson’s book How We Got To Now.
  10. Neuroskeptic skewers claims that “this will change your brain”.
  11. Young, middle-aged and old men all want women in their 20s. But they’re realistic about what they can get.
  12. Academics writing stinks.
  13. French regulators are mad. Or at least a touch madder than the rest.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. Why idiots succeed.
  2. Rory Sutherland on social norms.
  3. Economics incentives versus nudge (pdf). Don’t forget that basic economic mechanisms can work.
  4. We’re related to our friends.
  5. Are there really trillion dollar bills on the sidewalk?
  6. A bash of the Myers-Briggs test. Personally, I’m a fan of the big five plus g. On g, the heritability of chimp IQ.
  7. Talent versus practice. Talent wins this one.
  8. Throwing away money on brain science.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. David Dobbs on the social life of genes. Full of interesting ideas, although I’d love to see someone who knows more about this area critique it.
  2. Tim Harford reviews Scarcity.
  3. A good review of some new books on neuroscience.
  4. Dave Nussbaum on why you are working too hard.
  5. Ian Rickard pulls apart David Attenborough’s suggestion that humans are no longer evolving.
  6. And below, the latest two videos in the Evolution: This View of Life series On The Origin Of Human Behavior And Evolution Society: Doug Kenrick and John Tooby.

A week of links

Links this week:

  1. Sean Roberts on spurious correlations over at Replicated Typo.
  2. Some babble on the neuroscience bubble.
  3. Why do Jews succeedNoah Smith throws some reasons out there, but I expect Smith’s explanations would do a poor job of explaining ultra-success in the form of, say, Nobel prizes. And here’s Noah Millman’s take.
  4. And finally, below, an interview with Leda Cosmides (HT: Douglas Kenrick).